Events & Programs

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August, 2014

Teen Gaming

Aug
20

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Play your choice of games on the PS3 and Wii! Must be 12-18 and have a valid library card to play.

More Info

Twinkle Twinkle Baby Lap-sit Storytime (Argenta Branch)

Aug
21

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Baby Lap-sit Storytime is a program to encourage interaction between parents/caregivers and their baby (birth-18months). During the program we will learn simple nursery rhymes, songs and enjoy short stories. Parents are welcome to bring a small blanket for their baby to sit or lie on during the program, if they choose to be on the floor.

More Info

Job Seekers Clinic

Aug
21

Thursday, August 21, 2014

The Job Seekers Clinic provides patrons with free job-seeking assistance to help them gain employment.

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Doctor Who Night

Aug
21

Thursday, August 21, 2014

The doctor is back so we must celebrate!

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Afternoon Toons

Aug
22

Friday, August 22, 2014

Join us for your fave toons after school!

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Teen Gaming

Aug
23

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Play your choice of games on the PS3 and Wii! Must be 12-18 and have a valid library card to play.

More Info

A Thriller Brunch and Author Skype Talk

Aug
23

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Join us for a light Brunch and Skype Visit with Author Maegan Beaumont.
Carved in Darkness and Sacrificial Muse Event is FREE but registration is needed. Please call to reserve your seat.

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Bootcamp with Ebony

Aug
23

Saturday, August 23, 2014

A group fitness class taught by Ebony

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Tail Waggin' Tutors (Argenta Branch Library)

Aug
23

Saturday, August 23, 2014

This program provides a relaxed and "dog friendly" atmosphere, which allows children to practice their reading skills. It helps build self-esteem by sitting down next to a dog and reading to them. For more information, call 501-687-1061.

More Info

ZUMBA with Carla Townsend!

Aug
23

Saturday, August 23, 2014

By popular demand, Carla Townsend will be teaching free Zumba classes every Saturday at 11:00am. They're free and open to the public. Wear your workout attire and we'll see you in the auditorium!

More Info

Monday Movie Mania

Aug
25

Monday, August 25, 2014

Join us for epic movie marathons!

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Argenta Golden Agers

Aug
25

Monday, August 25, 2014

Music, trivia, movies, crafts and more for ours 50+ patrons.

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Tail Waggin' Tutors (Argenta Branch Library)

Aug
26

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

This program provides a relaxed and "dog friendly" atmosphere, which allows children to practice their reading skills. It helps build self-esteem by sitting down next to a dog and reading to them. For more information, call 501-687-1061.

More Info

Open Mic Night

Aug
26

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Show off your talents whatever it may be!

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Author Talk and Book-Signing with Former Congressman Ed Bethune

Aug
26

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Ed Bethune grew up in Arkansas and has a deep understanding of American culture. He joined the Marines when he was eighteen years old and rose to the rank of sergeant. He received an honorable discharge in 1954 and then earned two degrees from the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville, a bachelor of science from the School of Business Administration and a juris doctorate from the School of Law. He served four years as a special agent of the FBI including a tour of duty in Newark, N.J. during the race riots of 1967 and the turbulent year that followed. In 1970, he became a prosecuting attorney in Arkansas and then led a complete revision of Arkansas' antiquated rules of criminal procedure. As a trial lawyer, he prosecuted and defended many important cases, civil and criminal. In 1978, against all odds, he won a seat in the United States House of Representatives, the first Republican to hold that seat in 104 years. He served three terms in Congress and then lost a campaign for a seat in the United States Senate. After Congress, Bethune joined the law firm of Bracewell & Giuliani in Washington, D. C. where he specialized in ethics law and represented several congressional leaders (the speaker of the House, the majority leader, and others) in high-visibility matters before the House Ethics Committee. In 1990, he and his wife, Lana, attempted to sail a 31-foot sailboat across the Atlantic Ocean. After six days at sea, they encountered a fierce storm that disabled their boat. They tried to ride out the storm, but it wore them down. The Coast Guard responded to their call for help and rescued them, 210 miles south of Nantucket Island. The story of the rescue appears in his 2011 memoir, Jackhammered, a Life of Adventure. In 2013, Ed Bethune published Anatomy of a Memoir, a Kindle single that encourages everyone to write his or her life story. He and Lana reside in Little Rock, Arkansas. They have two children and eight granddaughters.

About the book?.
Wounds and prejudices stemming from the Civil War, the Great Depression and other conflicts run deep in the Ozark hill country. These frailties, like the scab of a putrid wound, will from time to time reopen and ooze pus. In the tumultuous year of 1968, a farmer stumbles onto the gruesome scene of a hate crime: the lynching of a young gay man whose mangled body has been left hanging from a tree. Clues abound, but the investigation withers and dies. Thirty-eight years later, Aubrey Hatfield and the citizens of Campbell County get a second chance to grapple with man?s greatest vice?the refusal to see wrong and do something about it. The life journey of protagonist Aubrey Hatfield contrasts the culture of the turbulent Sixties with today?s culture, and ponders how we should adapt to or resist the ever-changing notions of right and wrong. Thus, Gay Panic in the Ozarks is a disturbing story of the culture war that society is waging on itself. Brusque but humane, the novel examines love, hate, morality, honor, and duty?the things that inform and shape our destiny.

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Teen Gaming

Aug
27

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Play your choice of games on the PS3 and Wii! Must be 12-18 and have a valid library card to play.

More Info

Job Seekers Clinic

Aug
28

Thursday, August 28, 2014

The Job Seekers Clinic provides patrons with free job-seeking assistance to help them gain employment.

More Info

Teen Gaming

Aug
28

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Play your choice of games on the PS3 and Wii! Must be 12-18 and have a valid library card to play.

More Info

Afternoon Toons

Aug
29

Friday, August 29, 2014

Join us for your fave toons after school!

More Info

Teen Gaming

Aug
30

Saturday, August 30, 2014

Play your choice of games on the PS3 and Wii! Must be 12-18 and have a valid library card to play.

More Info

Bootcamp with Ebony

Aug
30

Saturday, August 30, 2014

A group fitness class taught by Ebony

More Info

Tail Waggin' Tutors (Argenta Branch Library)

Aug
30

Saturday, August 30, 2014

This program provides a relaxed and "dog friendly" atmosphere, which allows children to practice their reading skills. It helps build self-esteem by sitting down next to a dog and reading to them. For more information, call 501-687-1061.

More Info

ZUMBA with Carla Townsend!

Aug
30

Saturday, August 30, 2014

By popular demand, Carla Townsend will be teaching free Zumba classes every Saturday at 11:00am. They're free and open to the public. Wear your workout attire and we'll see you in the auditorium!

More Info

September, 2014

NEH on the Road Presents, "House and Home"

Sep
1

Monday, September 01, 2014

What makes a house a home?

Throughout American history, people have lived in all sorts of places, from military barracks and two-story colonials to college dormitories and row houses. Drawn from the flagship installation at The National Building Museum, House & Home embarks on a tour of houses both familiar and surprising, through past and present, to explore the varied history, and many cultural meanings of the American home.

The NEH on the Road version of House & Home draws on themes originated by the National Building Museum to encourage visitors to explore how our ideal of the perfect house and our experience of what it means to "be at home" have changed over time. The exhibition includes domestic furnishings and home construction materials, photographs, "please touch" interactive components, and films. Together, the objects and images illustrate how transformations in technology, government policy, and consumer culture have impacted American domestic life.

House & Home presents an overview of architecture styles and living patterns that have been featured in American homes over the years. Quotes, toys, and other graphic advertising materials prompt visitors to think about the different ideas embodied in the words "house" and "home." The exhibition also showcases domestic objects - from cooking utensils to telephones - and traces how household goods tell the stories of our family traditions, heritage, and the activity of daily living.

Another key section of House & Home explores how different laws, historic trends, and economic factors have impacted housing in America. The American Dream, once more generally seen as an aspiration to prosperity, grew in the 20th century to be synonymous with home ownership. Visitors learn about the economy of housing and how homes have been promoted and sold. Issues of housing inequality, land distribution, and the role of the government are examined, from the Colonial period though the Homestead Act and the creation of the Federal Housing Administration in the 1930s; and from the Oklahoma Land Rush to the subprime loan crisis. Related sections of House & Home looks outward, exploring the relationship of the individual house to the larger society by presenting examples of contemporary community development through film.

Video and film features immerse audiences in a nation-wide tour of residential buildings and community developments that reflect contemporary trends. From futuristic dormitories to post-Katrina communities built on shared interests in music, the images evoke the experience of residential space and illustrate the evolution and diversity of American domestic architecture, design, and community. In its scope, content, and presentation House & Home moves beyond the bricks and mortar to challenge our ideas about what it means to be at home in America.

More Info

Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France

Sep
1

Monday, September 01, 2014

More than three generations of Americans have grown up reading the stories of an irrepressible little brown monkey known in this country as ?Curious George.? But few people know about the incredible journey made by his creators, Margret and H.A. Rey, to escape the Nazi invasion of Paris at the start of World War II.

Stashing a few precious belongings and manuscripts in their knapsacks and the baskets of their bicycles, the Jewish couple fled Paris in June 1940, starting a five month odyssey by bike, train, and boat that would eventually bring them to American shores in October 1940.

The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France tells the story of the Rey?s journey, featuring 27 framed art prints by artist Allan Drummond and supplemental archival images from the extraordinary holdings of the DeGrummond Collection of Children?s Literature at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Based in part on the 2005 publication, The Journey that Saved Curious George: The True Wartime Escape of Margret and H.A. Rey, written by Louise Borden and illustrated by Allan Drummond (Houghton Mifflin Company, New York), The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey From France was organized by the Institute for Holocaust Education in Omaha, Nebraska. More than just the tale of a rousing escape from occupied France, this exhibition celebrates a timeless survival story, one that serves as a potent reminder of the power of human creativity and the cost when voices and visions are silenced by the impact of war.

More Info

NEH on the Road Presents, "House and Home"

Sep
2

Tuesday, September 02, 2014

What makes a house a home?

Throughout American history, people have lived in all sorts of places, from military barracks and two-story colonials to college dormitories and row houses. Drawn from the flagship installation at The National Building Museum, House & Home embarks on a tour of houses both familiar and surprising, through past and present, to explore the varied history, and many cultural meanings of the American home.

The NEH on the Road version of House & Home draws on themes originated by the National Building Museum to encourage visitors to explore how our ideal of the perfect house and our experience of what it means to "be at home" have changed over time. The exhibition includes domestic furnishings and home construction materials, photographs, "please touch" interactive components, and films. Together, the objects and images illustrate how transformations in technology, government policy, and consumer culture have impacted American domestic life.

House & Home presents an overview of architecture styles and living patterns that have been featured in American homes over the years. Quotes, toys, and other graphic advertising materials prompt visitors to think about the different ideas embodied in the words "house" and "home." The exhibition also showcases domestic objects - from cooking utensils to telephones - and traces how household goods tell the stories of our family traditions, heritage, and the activity of daily living.

Another key section of House & Home explores how different laws, historic trends, and economic factors have impacted housing in America. The American Dream, once more generally seen as an aspiration to prosperity, grew in the 20th century to be synonymous with home ownership. Visitors learn about the economy of housing and how homes have been promoted and sold. Issues of housing inequality, land distribution, and the role of the government are examined, from the Colonial period though the Homestead Act and the creation of the Federal Housing Administration in the 1930s; and from the Oklahoma Land Rush to the subprime loan crisis. Related sections of House & Home looks outward, exploring the relationship of the individual house to the larger society by presenting examples of contemporary community development through film.

Video and film features immerse audiences in a nation-wide tour of residential buildings and community developments that reflect contemporary trends. From futuristic dormitories to post-Katrina communities built on shared interests in music, the images evoke the experience of residential space and illustrate the evolution and diversity of American domestic architecture, design, and community. In its scope, content, and presentation House & Home moves beyond the bricks and mortar to challenge our ideas about what it means to be at home in America.

More Info

Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France

Sep
2

Tuesday, September 02, 2014

More than three generations of Americans have grown up reading the stories of an irrepressible little brown monkey known in this country as ?Curious George.? But few people know about the incredible journey made by his creators, Margret and H.A. Rey, to escape the Nazi invasion of Paris at the start of World War II.

Stashing a few precious belongings and manuscripts in their knapsacks and the baskets of their bicycles, the Jewish couple fled Paris in June 1940, starting a five month odyssey by bike, train, and boat that would eventually bring them to American shores in October 1940.

The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France tells the story of the Rey?s journey, featuring 27 framed art prints by artist Allan Drummond and supplemental archival images from the extraordinary holdings of the DeGrummond Collection of Children?s Literature at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Based in part on the 2005 publication, The Journey that Saved Curious George: The True Wartime Escape of Margret and H.A. Rey, written by Louise Borden and illustrated by Allan Drummond (Houghton Mifflin Company, New York), The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey From France was organized by the Institute for Holocaust Education in Omaha, Nebraska. More than just the tale of a rousing escape from occupied France, this exhibition celebrates a timeless survival story, one that serves as a potent reminder of the power of human creativity and the cost when voices and visions are silenced by the impact of war.

More Info

Tail Waggin' Tutors (Argenta Branch)

Sep
2

Tuesday, September 02, 2014

This program is to provide a relaxed and ?dog-friendly? atmosphere, which allows children to practice their reading skills. It helps build self-esteem by sitting down next to a dog and reading to them. For more information, call 687-1061.

More Info

AETN, KUAR, and Laman Library Present, "Community Cinema"

Sep
2

Tuesday, September 02, 2014

AETN, KUAR, and Laman Library present, Community Cinema, a free monthly screening series engaging communities through films produced by the Independent Television Service (ITVS), features monthly screenings followed by panel discussions with leading organizations, local communities and special guest speakers. The program is designed to help people learn about and get involved in the social issues raised in the documentaries.

More Info

NEH on the Road Presents, "House and Home"

Sep
3

Wednesday, September 03, 2014

What makes a house a home?

Throughout American history, people have lived in all sorts of places, from military barracks and two-story colonials to college dormitories and row houses. Drawn from the flagship installation at The National Building Museum, House & Home embarks on a tour of houses both familiar and surprising, through past and present, to explore the varied history, and many cultural meanings of the American home.

The NEH on the Road version of House & Home draws on themes originated by the National Building Museum to encourage visitors to explore how our ideal of the perfect house and our experience of what it means to "be at home" have changed over time. The exhibition includes domestic furnishings and home construction materials, photographs, "please touch" interactive components, and films. Together, the objects and images illustrate how transformations in technology, government policy, and consumer culture have impacted American domestic life.

House & Home presents an overview of architecture styles and living patterns that have been featured in American homes over the years. Quotes, toys, and other graphic advertising materials prompt visitors to think about the different ideas embodied in the words "house" and "home." The exhibition also showcases domestic objects - from cooking utensils to telephones - and traces how household goods tell the stories of our family traditions, heritage, and the activity of daily living.

Another key section of House & Home explores how different laws, historic trends, and economic factors have impacted housing in America. The American Dream, once more generally seen as an aspiration to prosperity, grew in the 20th century to be synonymous with home ownership. Visitors learn about the economy of housing and how homes have been promoted and sold. Issues of housing inequality, land distribution, and the role of the government are examined, from the Colonial period though the Homestead Act and the creation of the Federal Housing Administration in the 1930s; and from the Oklahoma Land Rush to the subprime loan crisis. Related sections of House & Home looks outward, exploring the relationship of the individual house to the larger society by presenting examples of contemporary community development through film.

Video and film features immerse audiences in a nation-wide tour of residential buildings and community developments that reflect contemporary trends. From futuristic dormitories to post-Katrina communities built on shared interests in music, the images evoke the experience of residential space and illustrate the evolution and diversity of American domestic architecture, design, and community. In its scope, content, and presentation House & Home moves beyond the bricks and mortar to challenge our ideas about what it means to be at home in America.

More Info

Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France

Sep
3

Wednesday, September 03, 2014

More than three generations of Americans have grown up reading the stories of an irrepressible little brown monkey known in this country as ?Curious George.? But few people know about the incredible journey made by his creators, Margret and H.A. Rey, to escape the Nazi invasion of Paris at the start of World War II.

Stashing a few precious belongings and manuscripts in their knapsacks and the baskets of their bicycles, the Jewish couple fled Paris in June 1940, starting a five month odyssey by bike, train, and boat that would eventually bring them to American shores in October 1940.

The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France tells the story of the Rey?s journey, featuring 27 framed art prints by artist Allan Drummond and supplemental archival images from the extraordinary holdings of the DeGrummond Collection of Children?s Literature at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Based in part on the 2005 publication, The Journey that Saved Curious George: The True Wartime Escape of Margret and H.A. Rey, written by Louise Borden and illustrated by Allan Drummond (Houghton Mifflin Company, New York), The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey From France was organized by the Institute for Holocaust Education in Omaha, Nebraska. More than just the tale of a rousing escape from occupied France, this exhibition celebrates a timeless survival story, one that serves as a potent reminder of the power of human creativity and the cost when voices and visions are silenced by the impact of war.

More Info

NEH on the Road Presents, "House and Home"

Sep
4

Thursday, September 04, 2014

What makes a house a home?

Throughout American history, people have lived in all sorts of places, from military barracks and two-story colonials to college dormitories and row houses. Drawn from the flagship installation at The National Building Museum, House & Home embarks on a tour of houses both familiar and surprising, through past and present, to explore the varied history, and many cultural meanings of the American home.

The NEH on the Road version of House & Home draws on themes originated by the National Building Museum to encourage visitors to explore how our ideal of the perfect house and our experience of what it means to "be at home" have changed over time. The exhibition includes domestic furnishings and home construction materials, photographs, "please touch" interactive components, and films. Together, the objects and images illustrate how transformations in technology, government policy, and consumer culture have impacted American domestic life.

House & Home presents an overview of architecture styles and living patterns that have been featured in American homes over the years. Quotes, toys, and other graphic advertising materials prompt visitors to think about the different ideas embodied in the words "house" and "home." The exhibition also showcases domestic objects - from cooking utensils to telephones - and traces how household goods tell the stories of our family traditions, heritage, and the activity of daily living.

Another key section of House & Home explores how different laws, historic trends, and economic factors have impacted housing in America. The American Dream, once more generally seen as an aspiration to prosperity, grew in the 20th century to be synonymous with home ownership. Visitors learn about the economy of housing and how homes have been promoted and sold. Issues of housing inequality, land distribution, and the role of the government are examined, from the Colonial period though the Homestead Act and the creation of the Federal Housing Administration in the 1930s; and from the Oklahoma Land Rush to the subprime loan crisis. Related sections of House & Home looks outward, exploring the relationship of the individual house to the larger society by presenting examples of contemporary community development through film.

Video and film features immerse audiences in a nation-wide tour of residential buildings and community developments that reflect contemporary trends. From futuristic dormitories to post-Katrina communities built on shared interests in music, the images evoke the experience of residential space and illustrate the evolution and diversity of American domestic architecture, design, and community. In its scope, content, and presentation House & Home moves beyond the bricks and mortar to challenge our ideas about what it means to be at home in America.

More Info

Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France

Sep
4

Thursday, September 04, 2014

More than three generations of Americans have grown up reading the stories of an irrepressible little brown monkey known in this country as ?Curious George.? But few people know about the incredible journey made by his creators, Margret and H.A. Rey, to escape the Nazi invasion of Paris at the start of World War II.

Stashing a few precious belongings and manuscripts in their knapsacks and the baskets of their bicycles, the Jewish couple fled Paris in June 1940, starting a five month odyssey by bike, train, and boat that would eventually bring them to American shores in October 1940.

The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France tells the story of the Rey?s journey, featuring 27 framed art prints by artist Allan Drummond and supplemental archival images from the extraordinary holdings of the DeGrummond Collection of Children?s Literature at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Based in part on the 2005 publication, The Journey that Saved Curious George: The True Wartime Escape of Margret and H.A. Rey, written by Louise Borden and illustrated by Allan Drummond (Houghton Mifflin Company, New York), The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey From France was organized by the Institute for Holocaust Education in Omaha, Nebraska. More than just the tale of a rousing escape from occupied France, this exhibition celebrates a timeless survival story, one that serves as a potent reminder of the power of human creativity and the cost when voices and visions are silenced by the impact of war.

More Info

Twinkle Twinkle Baby Lap-sit Storytime (Argenta Branch)

Sep
4

Thursday, September 04, 2014

Baby Lap-sit is a program to encourage interaction between parents/caregivers and their baby (birth-18 months). During the program we will learn simple nursery rhymes, songs and enjoy short stories. Parents are welcome to bring a small blanket for their baby to sit or lie on during the program, if they choose to be on the floor.

More Info

Job Seekers Clinic

Sep
4

Thursday, September 04, 2014

The Job Seekers Clinic provides patrons with free job-seeking assistance to help them gain employment.

More Info

NEH on the Road Presents, "House and Home"

Sep
5

Friday, September 05, 2014

What makes a house a home?

Throughout American history, people have lived in all sorts of places, from military barracks and two-story colonials to college dormitories and row houses. Drawn from the flagship installation at The National Building Museum, House & Home embarks on a tour of houses both familiar and surprising, through past and present, to explore the varied history, and many cultural meanings of the American home.

The NEH on the Road version of House & Home draws on themes originated by the National Building Museum to encourage visitors to explore how our ideal of the perfect house and our experience of what it means to "be at home" have changed over time. The exhibition includes domestic furnishings and home construction materials, photographs, "please touch" interactive components, and films. Together, the objects and images illustrate how transformations in technology, government policy, and consumer culture have impacted American domestic life.

House & Home presents an overview of architecture styles and living patterns that have been featured in American homes over the years. Quotes, toys, and other graphic advertising materials prompt visitors to think about the different ideas embodied in the words "house" and "home." The exhibition also showcases domestic objects - from cooking utensils to telephones - and traces how household goods tell the stories of our family traditions, heritage, and the activity of daily living.

Another key section of House & Home explores how different laws, historic trends, and economic factors have impacted housing in America. The American Dream, once more generally seen as an aspiration to prosperity, grew in the 20th century to be synonymous with home ownership. Visitors learn about the economy of housing and how homes have been promoted and sold. Issues of housing inequality, land distribution, and the role of the government are examined, from the Colonial period though the Homestead Act and the creation of the Federal Housing Administration in the 1930s; and from the Oklahoma Land Rush to the subprime loan crisis. Related sections of House & Home looks outward, exploring the relationship of the individual house to the larger society by presenting examples of contemporary community development through film.

Video and film features immerse audiences in a nation-wide tour of residential buildings and community developments that reflect contemporary trends. From futuristic dormitories to post-Katrina communities built on shared interests in music, the images evoke the experience of residential space and illustrate the evolution and diversity of American domestic architecture, design, and community. In its scope, content, and presentation House & Home moves beyond the bricks and mortar to challenge our ideas about what it means to be at home in America.

More Info

Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France

Sep
5

Friday, September 05, 2014

More than three generations of Americans have grown up reading the stories of an irrepressible little brown monkey known in this country as ?Curious George.? But few people know about the incredible journey made by his creators, Margret and H.A. Rey, to escape the Nazi invasion of Paris at the start of World War II.

Stashing a few precious belongings and manuscripts in their knapsacks and the baskets of their bicycles, the Jewish couple fled Paris in June 1940, starting a five month odyssey by bike, train, and boat that would eventually bring them to American shores in October 1940.

The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France tells the story of the Rey?s journey, featuring 27 framed art prints by artist Allan Drummond and supplemental archival images from the extraordinary holdings of the DeGrummond Collection of Children?s Literature at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Based in part on the 2005 publication, The Journey that Saved Curious George: The True Wartime Escape of Margret and H.A. Rey, written by Louise Borden and illustrated by Allan Drummond (Houghton Mifflin Company, New York), The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey From France was organized by the Institute for Holocaust Education in Omaha, Nebraska. More than just the tale of a rousing escape from occupied France, this exhibition celebrates a timeless survival story, one that serves as a potent reminder of the power of human creativity and the cost when voices and visions are silenced by the impact of war.

More Info

NEH on the Road Presents, "House and Home"

Sep
6

Saturday, September 06, 2014

What makes a house a home?

Throughout American history, people have lived in all sorts of places, from military barracks and two-story colonials to college dormitories and row houses. Drawn from the flagship installation at The National Building Museum, House & Home embarks on a tour of houses both familiar and surprising, through past and present, to explore the varied history, and many cultural meanings of the American home.

The NEH on the Road version of House & Home draws on themes originated by the National Building Museum to encourage visitors to explore how our ideal of the perfect house and our experience of what it means to "be at home" have changed over time. The exhibition includes domestic furnishings and home construction materials, photographs, "please touch" interactive components, and films. Together, the objects and images illustrate how transformations in technology, government policy, and consumer culture have impacted American domestic life.

House & Home presents an overview of architecture styles and living patterns that have been featured in American homes over the years. Quotes, toys, and other graphic advertising materials prompt visitors to think about the different ideas embodied in the words "house" and "home." The exhibition also showcases domestic objects - from cooking utensils to telephones - and traces how household goods tell the stories of our family traditions, heritage, and the activity of daily living.

Another key section of House & Home explores how different laws, historic trends, and economic factors have impacted housing in America. The American Dream, once more generally seen as an aspiration to prosperity, grew in the 20th century to be synonymous with home ownership. Visitors learn about the economy of housing and how homes have been promoted and sold. Issues of housing inequality, land distribution, and the role of the government are examined, from the Colonial period though the Homestead Act and the creation of the Federal Housing Administration in the 1930s; and from the Oklahoma Land Rush to the subprime loan crisis. Related sections of House & Home looks outward, exploring the relationship of the individual house to the larger society by presenting examples of contemporary community development through film.

Video and film features immerse audiences in a nation-wide tour of residential buildings and community developments that reflect contemporary trends. From futuristic dormitories to post-Katrina communities built on shared interests in music, the images evoke the experience of residential space and illustrate the evolution and diversity of American domestic architecture, design, and community. In its scope, content, and presentation House & Home moves beyond the bricks and mortar to challenge our ideas about what it means to be at home in America.

More Info

Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France

Sep
6

Saturday, September 06, 2014

More than three generations of Americans have grown up reading the stories of an irrepressible little brown monkey known in this country as ?Curious George.? But few people know about the incredible journey made by his creators, Margret and H.A. Rey, to escape the Nazi invasion of Paris at the start of World War II.

Stashing a few precious belongings and manuscripts in their knapsacks and the baskets of their bicycles, the Jewish couple fled Paris in June 1940, starting a five month odyssey by bike, train, and boat that would eventually bring them to American shores in October 1940.

The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France tells the story of the Rey?s journey, featuring 27 framed art prints by artist Allan Drummond and supplemental archival images from the extraordinary holdings of the DeGrummond Collection of Children?s Literature at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Based in part on the 2005 publication, The Journey that Saved Curious George: The True Wartime Escape of Margret and H.A. Rey, written by Louise Borden and illustrated by Allan Drummond (Houghton Mifflin Company, New York), The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey From France was organized by the Institute for Holocaust Education in Omaha, Nebraska. More than just the tale of a rousing escape from occupied France, this exhibition celebrates a timeless survival story, one that serves as a potent reminder of the power of human creativity and the cost when voices and visions are silenced by the impact of war.

More Info

Bootcamp with Ebony

Sep
6

Saturday, September 06, 2014

A group fitness class taught by Ebony

More Info

Tail Waggin' Tutors (Argenta Branch Library)

Sep
6

Saturday, September 06, 2014

This program provides a relaxed and "dog friendly" atmosphere, which allows children to practice their reading skills. It helps build self-esteem by sitting down next to a dog and reading to them. For more information, call 501-687-1061.

More Info

ZUMBA with Carla Townsend!

Sep
6

Saturday, September 06, 2014

By popular demand, Carla Townsend will be teaching free Zumba classes every Saturday at 11:00am. They're free and open to the public. Wear your workout attire and we'll see you in the auditorium!

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NEH on the Road Presents, "House and Home"

Sep
7

Sunday, September 07, 2014

What makes a house a home?

Throughout American history, people have lived in all sorts of places, from military barracks and two-story colonials to college dormitories and row houses. Drawn from the flagship installation at The National Building Museum, House & Home embarks on a tour of houses both familiar and surprising, through past and present, to explore the varied history, and many cultural meanings of the American home.

The NEH on the Road version of House & Home draws on themes originated by the National Building Museum to encourage visitors to explore how our ideal of the perfect house and our experience of what it means to "be at home" have changed over time. The exhibition includes domestic furnishings and home construction materials, photographs, "please touch" interactive components, and films. Together, the objects and images illustrate how transformations in technology, government policy, and consumer culture have impacted American domestic life.

House & Home presents an overview of architecture styles and living patterns that have been featured in American homes over the years. Quotes, toys, and other graphic advertising materials prompt visitors to think about the different ideas embodied in the words "house" and "home." The exhibition also showcases domestic objects - from cooking utensils to telephones - and traces how household goods tell the stories of our family traditions, heritage, and the activity of daily living.

Another key section of House & Home explores how different laws, historic trends, and economic factors have impacted housing in America. The American Dream, once more generally seen as an aspiration to prosperity, grew in the 20th century to be synonymous with home ownership. Visitors learn about the economy of housing and how homes have been promoted and sold. Issues of housing inequality, land distribution, and the role of the government are examined, from the Colonial period though the Homestead Act and the creation of the Federal Housing Administration in the 1930s; and from the Oklahoma Land Rush to the subprime loan crisis. Related sections of House & Home looks outward, exploring the relationship of the individual house to the larger society by presenting examples of contemporary community development through film.

Video and film features immerse audiences in a nation-wide tour of residential buildings and community developments that reflect contemporary trends. From futuristic dormitories to post-Katrina communities built on shared interests in music, the images evoke the experience of residential space and illustrate the evolution and diversity of American domestic architecture, design, and community. In its scope, content, and presentation House & Home moves beyond the bricks and mortar to challenge our ideas about what it means to be at home in America.

More Info

Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France

Sep
7

Sunday, September 07, 2014

More than three generations of Americans have grown up reading the stories of an irrepressible little brown monkey known in this country as ?Curious George.? But few people know about the incredible journey made by his creators, Margret and H.A. Rey, to escape the Nazi invasion of Paris at the start of World War II.

Stashing a few precious belongings and manuscripts in their knapsacks and the baskets of their bicycles, the Jewish couple fled Paris in June 1940, starting a five month odyssey by bike, train, and boat that would eventually bring them to American shores in October 1940.

The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France tells the story of the Rey?s journey, featuring 27 framed art prints by artist Allan Drummond and supplemental archival images from the extraordinary holdings of the DeGrummond Collection of Children?s Literature at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Based in part on the 2005 publication, The Journey that Saved Curious George: The True Wartime Escape of Margret and H.A. Rey, written by Louise Borden and illustrated by Allan Drummond (Houghton Mifflin Company, New York), The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey From France was organized by the Institute for Holocaust Education in Omaha, Nebraska. More than just the tale of a rousing escape from occupied France, this exhibition celebrates a timeless survival story, one that serves as a potent reminder of the power of human creativity and the cost when voices and visions are silenced by the impact of war.

More Info

NEH on the Road Presents, "House and Home"

Sep
8

Monday, September 08, 2014

What makes a house a home?

Throughout American history, people have lived in all sorts of places, from military barracks and two-story colonials to college dormitories and row houses. Drawn from the flagship installation at The National Building Museum, House & Home embarks on a tour of houses both familiar and surprising, through past and present, to explore the varied history, and many cultural meanings of the American home.

The NEH on the Road version of House & Home draws on themes originated by the National Building Museum to encourage visitors to explore how our ideal of the perfect house and our experience of what it means to "be at home" have changed over time. The exhibition includes domestic furnishings and home construction materials, photographs, "please touch" interactive components, and films. Together, the objects and images illustrate how transformations in technology, government policy, and consumer culture have impacted American domestic life.

House & Home presents an overview of architecture styles and living patterns that have been featured in American homes over the years. Quotes, toys, and other graphic advertising materials prompt visitors to think about the different ideas embodied in the words "house" and "home." The exhibition also showcases domestic objects - from cooking utensils to telephones - and traces how household goods tell the stories of our family traditions, heritage, and the activity of daily living.

Another key section of House & Home explores how different laws, historic trends, and economic factors have impacted housing in America. The American Dream, once more generally seen as an aspiration to prosperity, grew in the 20th century to be synonymous with home ownership. Visitors learn about the economy of housing and how homes have been promoted and sold. Issues of housing inequality, land distribution, and the role of the government are examined, from the Colonial period though the Homestead Act and the creation of the Federal Housing Administration in the 1930s; and from the Oklahoma Land Rush to the subprime loan crisis. Related sections of House & Home looks outward, exploring the relationship of the individual house to the larger society by presenting examples of contemporary community development through film.

Video and film features immerse audiences in a nation-wide tour of residential buildings and community developments that reflect contemporary trends. From futuristic dormitories to post-Katrina communities built on shared interests in music, the images evoke the experience of residential space and illustrate the evolution and diversity of American domestic architecture, design, and community. In its scope, content, and presentation House & Home moves beyond the bricks and mortar to challenge our ideas about what it means to be at home in America.

More Info

Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France

Sep
8

Monday, September 08, 2014

More than three generations of Americans have grown up reading the stories of an irrepressible little brown monkey known in this country as ?Curious George.? But few people know about the incredible journey made by his creators, Margret and H.A. Rey, to escape the Nazi invasion of Paris at the start of World War II.

Stashing a few precious belongings and manuscripts in their knapsacks and the baskets of their bicycles, the Jewish couple fled Paris in June 1940, starting a five month odyssey by bike, train, and boat that would eventually bring them to American shores in October 1940.

The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France tells the story of the Rey?s journey, featuring 27 framed art prints by artist Allan Drummond and supplemental archival images from the extraordinary holdings of the DeGrummond Collection of Children?s Literature at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Based in part on the 2005 publication, The Journey that Saved Curious George: The True Wartime Escape of Margret and H.A. Rey, written by Louise Borden and illustrated by Allan Drummond (Houghton Mifflin Company, New York), The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey From France was organized by the Institute for Holocaust Education in Omaha, Nebraska. More than just the tale of a rousing escape from occupied France, this exhibition celebrates a timeless survival story, one that serves as a potent reminder of the power of human creativity and the cost when voices and visions are silenced by the impact of war.

More Info

Early Voting - School Board Election

Sep
8

Monday, September 08, 2014

Early Voting - School Board Election - Equipment Delivery

More Info

NEH on the Road Presents, "House and Home"

Sep
9

Tuesday, September 09, 2014

What makes a house a home?

Throughout American history, people have lived in all sorts of places, from military barracks and two-story colonials to college dormitories and row houses. Drawn from the flagship installation at The National Building Museum, House & Home embarks on a tour of houses both familiar and surprising, through past and present, to explore the varied history, and many cultural meanings of the American home.

The NEH on the Road version of House & Home draws on themes originated by the National Building Museum to encourage visitors to explore how our ideal of the perfect house and our experience of what it means to "be at home" have changed over time. The exhibition includes domestic furnishings and home construction materials, photographs, "please touch" interactive components, and films. Together, the objects and images illustrate how transformations in technology, government policy, and consumer culture have impacted American domestic life.

House & Home presents an overview of architecture styles and living patterns that have been featured in American homes over the years. Quotes, toys, and other graphic advertising materials prompt visitors to think about the different ideas embodied in the words "house" and "home." The exhibition also showcases domestic objects - from cooking utensils to telephones - and traces how household goods tell the stories of our family traditions, heritage, and the activity of daily living.

Another key section of House & Home explores how different laws, historic trends, and economic factors have impacted housing in America. The American Dream, once more generally seen as an aspiration to prosperity, grew in the 20th century to be synonymous with home ownership. Visitors learn about the economy of housing and how homes have been promoted and sold. Issues of housing inequality, land distribution, and the role of the government are examined, from the Colonial period though the Homestead Act and the creation of the Federal Housing Administration in the 1930s; and from the Oklahoma Land Rush to the subprime loan crisis. Related sections of House & Home looks outward, exploring the relationship of the individual house to the larger society by presenting examples of contemporary community development through film.

Video and film features immerse audiences in a nation-wide tour of residential buildings and community developments that reflect contemporary trends. From futuristic dormitories to post-Katrina communities built on shared interests in music, the images evoke the experience of residential space and illustrate the evolution and diversity of American domestic architecture, design, and community. In its scope, content, and presentation House & Home moves beyond the bricks and mortar to challenge our ideas about what it means to be at home in America.

More Info

Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France

Sep
9

Tuesday, September 09, 2014

More than three generations of Americans have grown up reading the stories of an irrepressible little brown monkey known in this country as ?Curious George.? But few people know about the incredible journey made by his creators, Margret and H.A. Rey, to escape the Nazi invasion of Paris at the start of World War II.

Stashing a few precious belongings and manuscripts in their knapsacks and the baskets of their bicycles, the Jewish couple fled Paris in June 1940, starting a five month odyssey by bike, train, and boat that would eventually bring them to American shores in October 1940.

The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France tells the story of the Rey?s journey, featuring 27 framed art prints by artist Allan Drummond and supplemental archival images from the extraordinary holdings of the DeGrummond Collection of Children?s Literature at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Based in part on the 2005 publication, The Journey that Saved Curious George: The True Wartime Escape of Margret and H.A. Rey, written by Louise Borden and illustrated by Allan Drummond (Houghton Mifflin Company, New York), The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey From France was organized by the Institute for Holocaust Education in Omaha, Nebraska. More than just the tale of a rousing escape from occupied France, this exhibition celebrates a timeless survival story, one that serves as a potent reminder of the power of human creativity and the cost when voices and visions are silenced by the impact of war.

More Info

Early Voting - School Board Election

Sep
9

Tuesday, September 09, 2014

Early Voting - School Board Election

More Info

STORYTIME

Sep
9

Tuesday, September 09, 2014

Preschool age children are invited to come hear stories and make a craft.

More Info

Tail Waggin' Tutors (Argenta Branch)

Sep
9

Tuesday, September 09, 2014

This program is to provide a relaxed and ?dog-friendly? atmosphere, which allows children to practice their reading skills. It helps build self-esteem by sitting down next to a dog and reading to them. For more information, call 687-1061.

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TERRIFIC TUESDAY

Sep
9

Tuesday, September 09, 2014

Bring the kids after school for fun and games!

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Cooking Matters - Session 5

Sep
9

Tuesday, September 09, 2014

Note: Advanced registration is required for this program. Email Debra.Wood@LamanLibrary.org or call 771.1995 x105 to sign up!

In partnership with the Arkansas Hunger Relief Alliance and NLR's Fit 2 Live program, "Fit 2 Live" at Laman presents, Cooking Matters. Cooking Matters, an innovative nutrition education program offering 6-week Signature Courses, teaches individuals and families the skills they need to cook healthy meals and get the most from their food budgets. The Cooking Matters classes are hands-on, full participation classes taught by volunteer chefs and nutrition experts from communities large and small. Participants learn how to select nutritious, low-cost ingredients and how to turn those ingredients into delicious meals for their families. Graduates of Cooking Matters Signature Courses don?t just leave with cooking skills; they leave with the confidence and pride in knowing they can make a difference in the health and happiness of their families.

More Info

NEH on the Road Presents, "House and Home"

Sep
10

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

What makes a house a home?

Throughout American history, people have lived in all sorts of places, from military barracks and two-story colonials to college dormitories and row houses. Drawn from the flagship installation at The National Building Museum, House & Home embarks on a tour of houses both familiar and surprising, through past and present, to explore the varied history, and many cultural meanings of the American home.

The NEH on the Road version of House & Home draws on themes originated by the National Building Museum to encourage visitors to explore how our ideal of the perfect house and our experience of what it means to "be at home" have changed over time. The exhibition includes domestic furnishings and home construction materials, photographs, "please touch" interactive components, and films. Together, the objects and images illustrate how transformations in technology, government policy, and consumer culture have impacted American domestic life.

House & Home presents an overview of architecture styles and living patterns that have been featured in American homes over the years. Quotes, toys, and other graphic advertising materials prompt visitors to think about the different ideas embodied in the words "house" and "home." The exhibition also showcases domestic objects - from cooking utensils to telephones - and traces how household goods tell the stories of our family traditions, heritage, and the activity of daily living.

Another key section of House & Home explores how different laws, historic trends, and economic factors have impacted housing in America. The American Dream, once more generally seen as an aspiration to prosperity, grew in the 20th century to be synonymous with home ownership. Visitors learn about the economy of housing and how homes have been promoted and sold. Issues of housing inequality, land distribution, and the role of the government are examined, from the Colonial period though the Homestead Act and the creation of the Federal Housing Administration in the 1930s; and from the Oklahoma Land Rush to the subprime loan crisis. Related sections of House & Home looks outward, exploring the relationship of the individual house to the larger society by presenting examples of contemporary community development through film.

Video and film features immerse audiences in a nation-wide tour of residential buildings and community developments that reflect contemporary trends. From futuristic dormitories to post-Katrina communities built on shared interests in music, the images evoke the experience of residential space and illustrate the evolution and diversity of American domestic architecture, design, and community. In its scope, content, and presentation House & Home moves beyond the bricks and mortar to challenge our ideas about what it means to be at home in America.

More Info

Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France

Sep
10

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

More than three generations of Americans have grown up reading the stories of an irrepressible little brown monkey known in this country as ?Curious George.? But few people know about the incredible journey made by his creators, Margret and H.A. Rey, to escape the Nazi invasion of Paris at the start of World War II.

Stashing a few precious belongings and manuscripts in their knapsacks and the baskets of their bicycles, the Jewish couple fled Paris in June 1940, starting a five month odyssey by bike, train, and boat that would eventually bring them to American shores in October 1940.

The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France tells the story of the Rey?s journey, featuring 27 framed art prints by artist Allan Drummond and supplemental archival images from the extraordinary holdings of the DeGrummond Collection of Children?s Literature at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Based in part on the 2005 publication, The Journey that Saved Curious George: The True Wartime Escape of Margret and H.A. Rey, written by Louise Borden and illustrated by Allan Drummond (Houghton Mifflin Company, New York), The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey From France was organized by the Institute for Holocaust Education in Omaha, Nebraska. More than just the tale of a rousing escape from occupied France, this exhibition celebrates a timeless survival story, one that serves as a potent reminder of the power of human creativity and the cost when voices and visions are silenced by the impact of war.

More Info

Early Voting - School Board Election

Sep
10

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Early Voting - School Board Election

More Info

STORYTIME

Sep
10

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Preschool age children are invited to come hear stories and make a craft.

More Info

BABYTIME

Sep
10

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Babies, ages 6 months to 2 years, and their caretakers will enjoy stories, songs, and fingerplays.

More Info

NEH on the Road Presents, "House and Home"

Sep
11

Thursday, September 11, 2014

What makes a house a home?

Throughout American history, people have lived in all sorts of places, from military barracks and two-story colonials to college dormitories and row houses. Drawn from the flagship installation at The National Building Museum, House & Home embarks on a tour of houses both familiar and surprising, through past and present, to explore the varied history, and many cultural meanings of the American home.

The NEH on the Road version of House & Home draws on themes originated by the National Building Museum to encourage visitors to explore how our ideal of the perfect house and our experience of what it means to "be at home" have changed over time. The exhibition includes domestic furnishings and home construction materials, photographs, "please touch" interactive components, and films. Together, the objects and images illustrate how transformations in technology, government policy, and consumer culture have impacted American domestic life.

House & Home presents an overview of architecture styles and living patterns that have been featured in American homes over the years. Quotes, toys, and other graphic advertising materials prompt visitors to think about the different ideas embodied in the words "house" and "home." The exhibition also showcases domestic objects - from cooking utensils to telephones - and traces how household goods tell the stories of our family traditions, heritage, and the activity of daily living.

Another key section of House & Home explores how different laws, historic trends, and economic factors have impacted housing in America. The American Dream, once more generally seen as an aspiration to prosperity, grew in the 20th century to be synonymous with home ownership. Visitors learn about the economy of housing and how homes have been promoted and sold. Issues of housing inequality, land distribution, and the role of the government are examined, from the Colonial period though the Homestead Act and the creation of the Federal Housing Administration in the 1930s; and from the Oklahoma Land Rush to the subprime loan crisis. Related sections of House & Home looks outward, exploring the relationship of the individual house to the larger society by presenting examples of contemporary community development through film.

Video and film features immerse audiences in a nation-wide tour of residential buildings and community developments that reflect contemporary trends. From futuristic dormitories to post-Katrina communities built on shared interests in music, the images evoke the experience of residential space and illustrate the evolution and diversity of American domestic architecture, design, and community. In its scope, content, and presentation House & Home moves beyond the bricks and mortar to challenge our ideas about what it means to be at home in America.

More Info

Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France

Sep
11

Thursday, September 11, 2014

More than three generations of Americans have grown up reading the stories of an irrepressible little brown monkey known in this country as ?Curious George.? But few people know about the incredible journey made by his creators, Margret and H.A. Rey, to escape the Nazi invasion of Paris at the start of World War II.

Stashing a few precious belongings and manuscripts in their knapsacks and the baskets of their bicycles, the Jewish couple fled Paris in June 1940, starting a five month odyssey by bike, train, and boat that would eventually bring them to American shores in October 1940.

The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France tells the story of the Rey?s journey, featuring 27 framed art prints by artist Allan Drummond and supplemental archival images from the extraordinary holdings of the DeGrummond Collection of Children?s Literature at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Based in part on the 2005 publication, The Journey that Saved Curious George: The True Wartime Escape of Margret and H.A. Rey, written by Louise Borden and illustrated by Allan Drummond (Houghton Mifflin Company, New York), The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey From France was organized by the Institute for Holocaust Education in Omaha, Nebraska. More than just the tale of a rousing escape from occupied France, this exhibition celebrates a timeless survival story, one that serves as a potent reminder of the power of human creativity and the cost when voices and visions are silenced by the impact of war.

More Info

Early Voting - School Board Election

Sep
11

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Early Voting - School Board Election

More Info

Storytime (Argenta Branch Library)

Sep
11

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Join the Argenta Children's Dept. for storytime.

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Job Seekers Clinic

Sep
11

Thursday, September 11, 2014

The Job Seekers Clinic provides patrons with free job-seeking assistance to help them gain employment.

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CREATION STATION

Sep
11

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Join us for crafts and other fun hands-on activities!
Children all ages welcome

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Live at Laman Featuring Charlotte Taylor and Gypsy Rain

Sep
11

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Little Rock, Arkansas singer-songwriter Charlotte Taylor has been performing since an early age. Born and raised in Heber Springs, Taylor formed her first band, Project Blue in 1994 after getting hooked on the blues, and went on to record on the famed Memphis label, Hi Records. Her CD entitled ?Taylor and Martinez? featuring guitarist George Martinez, was released in 2000, and received many great reviews and airplay on blues formatted radio across the U.S. and Europe, and was the first release on Hi in over 20 years. Produced by Roy Orbison band alum, (drums on ?Pretty Woman?) Oliver Warren, Stevie Ray Vaughan producer Danny Jones, and with performances by the Memphis Horns, the album features 10 original songs written by the duo of Taylor and Martinez, with the cover song ?Cry Me A River? produced by Hi Records founder and Al Green producer, Willie Mitchell.

Taylor has been compared to blues legends Etta James and Bonnie Raitt, as well as being influenced by rockers, Janis Joplin, and Nancy Wilson of Heart, and even British Soul singer Annie Lennox. With many musical influences, including her mother whom Taylor says ?was a great singer,? she has described her style as eclectic, but always with soul. ?I want to make you feel something when I sing? she said. The songs I write are usually about something that happened, and can be very personal, others might be about something I heard someone say, or just a hook that wouldn?t get out of my head. A lot of the blues songs are about relationships, love, and lost loves, all the songs are about life.

Taylor and her band Gypsy Rain have won numerous blues competitions across the mid-south, and have played on Beale St. in Memphis at B.B. King?s, The Rum Boogie, The Hard Rock Café, King?s Palace and Blues Hall and competed in the International Blues Challenge. Charlotte Taylor and Gypsy Rain have performed at many blues festivals including Riverfest in Little Rock, The Riverwalk Blues Festival in Ft Lauderdale, Fl., The Spa City Blues Festival in Hot Springs, AR., Blues Eureka in Eureka Springs, AR., and the King Biscuit Blues Festival in Helena, AR.

Gypsy Rain features multi-instrumentalist Matthew Stone on guitar and pedal steel. Originally from Chicago, Matt plays with great skill and passion and excels in many genres of music. Searcy Arkansas native , Berkley School of music graduate, and one of the original members of Project Blue Dr. Bruce Johnston plays bass. Johnston received his doctorate in musical composition from the University of Miami, and currently teaches jazz guitar and bass at Ouachita Baptist University in Arkadelphia. Dr. Bruce is a master in many styles and genres and instruments, but has focused mostly on blues and jazz on the bass. John Roach has been a member of Gypsy Rain for over 10 years and attended the University of Central Arkansas in Conway where he played in the big band. John has many influences from percussion especially the hard-hitting Led Zeppelin drummer John Bonham, and always plays with great passion and soul.

More Info

NEH on the Road Presents, "House and Home"

Sep
12

Friday, September 12, 2014

What makes a house a home?

Throughout American history, people have lived in all sorts of places, from military barracks and two-story colonials to college dormitories and row houses. Drawn from the flagship installation at The National Building Museum, House & Home embarks on a tour of houses both familiar and surprising, through past and present, to explore the varied history, and many cultural meanings of the American home.

The NEH on the Road version of House & Home draws on themes originated by the National Building Museum to encourage visitors to explore how our ideal of the perfect house and our experience of what it means to "be at home" have changed over time. The exhibition includes domestic furnishings and home construction materials, photographs, "please touch" interactive components, and films. Together, the objects and images illustrate how transformations in technology, government policy, and consumer culture have impacted American domestic life.

House & Home presents an overview of architecture styles and living patterns that have been featured in American homes over the years. Quotes, toys, and other graphic advertising materials prompt visitors to think about the different ideas embodied in the words "house" and "home." The exhibition also showcases domestic objects - from cooking utensils to telephones - and traces how household goods tell the stories of our family traditions, heritage, and the activity of daily living.

Another key section of House & Home explores how different laws, historic trends, and economic factors have impacted housing in America. The American Dream, once more generally seen as an aspiration to prosperity, grew in the 20th century to be synonymous with home ownership. Visitors learn about the economy of housing and how homes have been promoted and sold. Issues of housing inequality, land distribution, and the role of the government are examined, from the Colonial period though the Homestead Act and the creation of the Federal Housing Administration in the 1930s; and from the Oklahoma Land Rush to the subprime loan crisis. Related sections of House & Home looks outward, exploring the relationship of the individual house to the larger society by presenting examples of contemporary community development through film.

Video and film features immerse audiences in a nation-wide tour of residential buildings and community developments that reflect contemporary trends. From futuristic dormitories to post-Katrina communities built on shared interests in music, the images evoke the experience of residential space and illustrate the evolution and diversity of American domestic architecture, design, and community. In its scope, content, and presentation House & Home moves beyond the bricks and mortar to challenge our ideas about what it means to be at home in America.

More Info

Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France

Sep
12

Friday, September 12, 2014

More than three generations of Americans have grown up reading the stories of an irrepressible little brown monkey known in this country as ?Curious George.? But few people know about the incredible journey made by his creators, Margret and H.A. Rey, to escape the Nazi invasion of Paris at the start of World War II.

Stashing a few precious belongings and manuscripts in their knapsacks and the baskets of their bicycles, the Jewish couple fled Paris in June 1940, starting a five month odyssey by bike, train, and boat that would eventually bring them to American shores in October 1940.

The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France tells the story of the Rey?s journey, featuring 27 framed art prints by artist Allan Drummond and supplemental archival images from the extraordinary holdings of the DeGrummond Collection of Children?s Literature at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Based in part on the 2005 publication, The Journey that Saved Curious George: The True Wartime Escape of Margret and H.A. Rey, written by Louise Borden and illustrated by Allan Drummond (Houghton Mifflin Company, New York), The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey From France was organized by the Institute for Holocaust Education in Omaha, Nebraska. More than just the tale of a rousing escape from occupied France, this exhibition celebrates a timeless survival story, one that serves as a potent reminder of the power of human creativity and the cost when voices and visions are silenced by the impact of war.

More Info

Early Voting - School Board Election

Sep
12

Friday, September 12, 2014

Early Voting - School Board Election

More Info

NEH on the Road Presents, "House and Home"

Sep
13

Saturday, September 13, 2014

What makes a house a home?

Throughout American history, people have lived in all sorts of places, from military barracks and two-story colonials to college dormitories and row houses. Drawn from the flagship installation at The National Building Museum, House & Home embarks on a tour of houses both familiar and surprising, through past and present, to explore the varied history, and many cultural meanings of the American home.

The NEH on the Road version of House & Home draws on themes originated by the National Building Museum to encourage visitors to explore how our ideal of the perfect house and our experience of what it means to "be at home" have changed over time. The exhibition includes domestic furnishings and home construction materials, photographs, "please touch" interactive components, and films. Together, the objects and images illustrate how transformations in technology, government policy, and consumer culture have impacted American domestic life.

House & Home presents an overview of architecture styles and living patterns that have been featured in American homes over the years. Quotes, toys, and other graphic advertising materials prompt visitors to think about the different ideas embodied in the words "house" and "home." The exhibition also showcases domestic objects - from cooking utensils to telephones - and traces how household goods tell the stories of our family traditions, heritage, and the activity of daily living.

Another key section of House & Home explores how different laws, historic trends, and economic factors have impacted housing in America. The American Dream, once more generally seen as an aspiration to prosperity, grew in the 20th century to be synonymous with home ownership. Visitors learn about the economy of housing and how homes have been promoted and sold. Issues of housing inequality, land distribution, and the role of the government are examined, from the Colonial period though the Homestead Act and the creation of the Federal Housing Administration in the 1930s; and from the Oklahoma Land Rush to the subprime loan crisis. Related sections of House & Home looks outward, exploring the relationship of the individual house to the larger society by presenting examples of contemporary community development through film.

Video and film features immerse audiences in a nation-wide tour of residential buildings and community developments that reflect contemporary trends. From futuristic dormitories to post-Katrina communities built on shared interests in music, the images evoke the experience of residential space and illustrate the evolution and diversity of American domestic architecture, design, and community. In its scope, content, and presentation House & Home moves beyond the bricks and mortar to challenge our ideas about what it means to be at home in America.

More Info

Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France

Sep
13

Saturday, September 13, 2014

More than three generations of Americans have grown up reading the stories of an irrepressible little brown monkey known in this country as ?Curious George.? But few people know about the incredible journey made by his creators, Margret and H.A. Rey, to escape the Nazi invasion of Paris at the start of World War II.

Stashing a few precious belongings and manuscripts in their knapsacks and the baskets of their bicycles, the Jewish couple fled Paris in June 1940, starting a five month odyssey by bike, train, and boat that would eventually bring them to American shores in October 1940.

The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France tells the story of the Rey?s journey, featuring 27 framed art prints by artist Allan Drummond and supplemental archival images from the extraordinary holdings of the DeGrummond Collection of Children?s Literature at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Based in part on the 2005 publication, The Journey that Saved Curious George: The True Wartime Escape of Margret and H.A. Rey, written by Louise Borden and illustrated by Allan Drummond (Houghton Mifflin Company, New York), The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey From France was organized by the Institute for Holocaust Education in Omaha, Nebraska. More than just the tale of a rousing escape from occupied France, this exhibition celebrates a timeless survival story, one that serves as a potent reminder of the power of human creativity and the cost when voices and visions are silenced by the impact of war.

More Info

Bootcamp with Ebony

Sep
13

Saturday, September 13, 2014

A group fitness class taught by Ebony

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Tail Waggin' Tutors (Argenta Branch Library)

Sep
13

Saturday, September 13, 2014

This program provides a relaxed and "dog friendly" atmosphere, which allows children to practice their reading skills. It helps build self-esteem by sitting down next to a dog and reading to them. For more information, call 501-687-1061.

More Info

Teddy Bear Picnic with the Tail Waggin' Tutors & Good Gardens

Sep
13

Saturday, September 13, 2014

It's time for our Teddy Bear Picnic! Join us for lots of fun! Bring your favorite bear or stuffed animal.

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ZUMBA with Carla Townsend!

Sep
13

Saturday, September 13, 2014

By popular demand, Carla Townsend will be teaching free Zumba classes every Saturday at 11:00am. They're free and open to the public. Wear your workout attire and we'll see you in the auditorium!

More Info

NEH on the Road Presents, "House and Home"

Sep
14

Sunday, September 14, 2014

What makes a house a home?

Throughout American history, people have lived in all sorts of places, from military barracks and two-story colonials to college dormitories and row houses. Drawn from the flagship installation at The National Building Museum, House & Home embarks on a tour of houses both familiar and surprising, through past and present, to explore the varied history, and many cultural meanings of the American home.

The NEH on the Road version of House & Home draws on themes originated by the National Building Museum to encourage visitors to explore how our ideal of the perfect house and our experience of what it means to "be at home" have changed over time. The exhibition includes domestic furnishings and home construction materials, photographs, "please touch" interactive components, and films. Together, the objects and images illustrate how transformations in technology, government policy, and consumer culture have impacted American domestic life.

House & Home presents an overview of architecture styles and living patterns that have been featured in American homes over the years. Quotes, toys, and other graphic advertising materials prompt visitors to think about the different ideas embodied in the words "house" and "home." The exhibition also showcases domestic objects - from cooking utensils to telephones - and traces how household goods tell the stories of our family traditions, heritage, and the activity of daily living.

Another key section of House & Home explores how different laws, historic trends, and economic factors have impacted housing in America. The American Dream, once more generally seen as an aspiration to prosperity, grew in the 20th century to be synonymous with home ownership. Visitors learn about the economy of housing and how homes have been promoted and sold. Issues of housing inequality, land distribution, and the role of the government are examined, from the Colonial period though the Homestead Act and the creation of the Federal Housing Administration in the 1930s; and from the Oklahoma Land Rush to the subprime loan crisis. Related sections of House & Home looks outward, exploring the relationship of the individual house to the larger society by presenting examples of contemporary community development through film.

Video and film features immerse audiences in a nation-wide tour of residential buildings and community developments that reflect contemporary trends. From futuristic dormitories to post-Katrina communities built on shared interests in music, the images evoke the experience of residential space and illustrate the evolution and diversity of American domestic architecture, design, and community. In its scope, content, and presentation House & Home moves beyond the bricks and mortar to challenge our ideas about what it means to be at home in America.

More Info

Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France

Sep
14

Sunday, September 14, 2014

More than three generations of Americans have grown up reading the stories of an irrepressible little brown monkey known in this country as ?Curious George.? But few people know about the incredible journey made by his creators, Margret and H.A. Rey, to escape the Nazi invasion of Paris at the start of World War II.

Stashing a few precious belongings and manuscripts in their knapsacks and the baskets of their bicycles, the Jewish couple fled Paris in June 1940, starting a five month odyssey by bike, train, and boat that would eventually bring them to American shores in October 1940.

The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France tells the story of the Rey?s journey, featuring 27 framed art prints by artist Allan Drummond and supplemental archival images from the extraordinary holdings of the DeGrummond Collection of Children?s Literature at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Based in part on the 2005 publication, The Journey that Saved Curious George: The True Wartime Escape of Margret and H.A. Rey, written by Louise Borden and illustrated by Allan Drummond (Houghton Mifflin Company, New York), The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey From France was organized by the Institute for Holocaust Education in Omaha, Nebraska. More than just the tale of a rousing escape from occupied France, this exhibition celebrates a timeless survival story, one that serves as a potent reminder of the power of human creativity and the cost when voices and visions are silenced by the impact of war.

More Info

NEH on the Road Presents, "House and Home"

Sep
15

Monday, September 15, 2014

What makes a house a home?

Throughout American history, people have lived in all sorts of places, from military barracks and two-story colonials to college dormitories and row houses. Drawn from the flagship installation at The National Building Museum, House & Home embarks on a tour of houses both familiar and surprising, through past and present, to explore the varied history, and many cultural meanings of the American home.

The NEH on the Road version of House & Home draws on themes originated by the National Building Museum to encourage visitors to explore how our ideal of the perfect house and our experience of what it means to "be at home" have changed over time. The exhibition includes domestic furnishings and home construction materials, photographs, "please touch" interactive components, and films. Together, the objects and images illustrate how transformations in technology, government policy, and consumer culture have impacted American domestic life.

House & Home presents an overview of architecture styles and living patterns that have been featured in American homes over the years. Quotes, toys, and other graphic advertising materials prompt visitors to think about the different ideas embodied in the words "house" and "home." The exhibition also showcases domestic objects - from cooking utensils to telephones - and traces how household goods tell the stories of our family traditions, heritage, and the activity of daily living.

Another key section of House & Home explores how different laws, historic trends, and economic factors have impacted housing in America. The American Dream, once more generally seen as an aspiration to prosperity, grew in the 20th century to be synonymous with home ownership. Visitors learn about the economy of housing and how homes have been promoted and sold. Issues of housing inequality, land distribution, and the role of the government are examined, from the Colonial period though the Homestead Act and the creation of the Federal Housing Administration in the 1930s; and from the Oklahoma Land Rush to the subprime loan crisis. Related sections of House & Home looks outward, exploring the relationship of the individual house to the larger society by presenting examples of contemporary community development through film.

Video and film features immerse audiences in a nation-wide tour of residential buildings and community developments that reflect contemporary trends. From futuristic dormitories to post-Katrina communities built on shared interests in music, the images evoke the experience of residential space and illustrate the evolution and diversity of American domestic architecture, design, and community. In its scope, content, and presentation House & Home moves beyond the bricks and mortar to challenge our ideas about what it means to be at home in America.

More Info

Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France

Sep
15

Monday, September 15, 2014

More than three generations of Americans have grown up reading the stories of an irrepressible little brown monkey known in this country as ?Curious George.? But few people know about the incredible journey made by his creators, Margret and H.A. Rey, to escape the Nazi invasion of Paris at the start of World War II.

Stashing a few precious belongings and manuscripts in their knapsacks and the baskets of their bicycles, the Jewish couple fled Paris in June 1940, starting a five month odyssey by bike, train, and boat that would eventually bring them to American shores in October 1940.

The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France tells the story of the Rey?s journey, featuring 27 framed art prints by artist Allan Drummond and supplemental archival images from the extraordinary holdings of the DeGrummond Collection of Children?s Literature at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Based in part on the 2005 publication, The Journey that Saved Curious George: The True Wartime Escape of Margret and H.A. Rey, written by Louise Borden and illustrated by Allan Drummond (Houghton Mifflin Company, New York), The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey From France was organized by the Institute for Holocaust Education in Omaha, Nebraska. More than just the tale of a rousing escape from occupied France, this exhibition celebrates a timeless survival story, one that serves as a potent reminder of the power of human creativity and the cost when voices and visions are silenced by the impact of war.

More Info

NEH on the Road Presents, "House and Home"

Sep
16

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

What makes a house a home?

Throughout American history, people have lived in all sorts of places, from military barracks and two-story colonials to college dormitories and row houses. Drawn from the flagship installation at The National Building Museum, House & Home embarks on a tour of houses both familiar and surprising, through past and present, to explore the varied history, and many cultural meanings of the American home.

The NEH on the Road version of House & Home draws on themes originated by the National Building Museum to encourage visitors to explore how our ideal of the perfect house and our experience of what it means to "be at home" have changed over time. The exhibition includes domestic furnishings and home construction materials, photographs, "please touch" interactive components, and films. Together, the objects and images illustrate how transformations in technology, government policy, and consumer culture have impacted American domestic life.

House & Home presents an overview of architecture styles and living patterns that have been featured in American homes over the years. Quotes, toys, and other graphic advertising materials prompt visitors to think about the different ideas embodied in the words "house" and "home." The exhibition also showcases domestic objects - from cooking utensils to telephones - and traces how household goods tell the stories of our family traditions, heritage, and the activity of daily living.

Another key section of House & Home explores how different laws, historic trends, and economic factors have impacted housing in America. The American Dream, once more generally seen as an aspiration to prosperity, grew in the 20th century to be synonymous with home ownership. Visitors learn about the economy of housing and how homes have been promoted and sold. Issues of housing inequality, land distribution, and the role of the government are examined, from the Colonial period though the Homestead Act and the creation of the Federal Housing Administration in the 1930s; and from the Oklahoma Land Rush to the subprime loan crisis. Related sections of House & Home looks outward, exploring the relationship of the individual house to the larger society by presenting examples of contemporary community development through film.

Video and film features immerse audiences in a nation-wide tour of residential buildings and community developments that reflect contemporary trends. From futuristic dormitories to post-Katrina communities built on shared interests in music, the images evoke the experience of residential space and illustrate the evolution and diversity of American domestic architecture, design, and community. In its scope, content, and presentation House & Home moves beyond the bricks and mortar to challenge our ideas about what it means to be at home in America.

More Info

Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France

Sep
16

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

More than three generations of Americans have grown up reading the stories of an irrepressible little brown monkey known in this country as ?Curious George.? But few people know about the incredible journey made by his creators, Margret and H.A. Rey, to escape the Nazi invasion of Paris at the start of World War II.

Stashing a few precious belongings and manuscripts in their knapsacks and the baskets of their bicycles, the Jewish couple fled Paris in June 1940, starting a five month odyssey by bike, train, and boat that would eventually bring them to American shores in October 1940.

The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France tells the story of the Rey?s journey, featuring 27 framed art prints by artist Allan Drummond and supplemental archival images from the extraordinary holdings of the DeGrummond Collection of Children?s Literature at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Based in part on the 2005 publication, The Journey that Saved Curious George: The True Wartime Escape of Margret and H.A. Rey, written by Louise Borden and illustrated by Allan Drummond (Houghton Mifflin Company, New York), The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey From France was organized by the Institute for Holocaust Education in Omaha, Nebraska. More than just the tale of a rousing escape from occupied France, this exhibition celebrates a timeless survival story, one that serves as a potent reminder of the power of human creativity and the cost when voices and visions are silenced by the impact of war.

More Info

STORYTIME

Sep
16

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Preschool age children are invited to come hear stories and make a craft.

More Info

Tail Waggin' Tutors (Argenta Branch)

Sep
16

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

This program is to provide a relaxed and ?dog-friendly? atmosphere, which allows children to practice their reading skills. It helps build self-esteem by sitting down next to a dog and reading to them. For more information, call 687-1061.

More Info

TERRIFIC TUESDAY

Sep
16

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Bring the kids after school for fun and games!

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"Fit 2 Live" at Laman! Presents, "Get Fit with NLRHS Football Coach Bolding"

Sep
16

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Join NLR's "Fit 2 Live" program the third Tuesday of each month at 6:30pm in the auditorium. Led by "Fit 2 Live" coordinator, Bernadette Rhodes, this program will introduce patrons to all things health! Featuring special speakers, films, demonstrations, and tips!

More Info

Cooking Matters - Session 5

Sep
16

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Note: Advanced registration is required for this program. Email Debra.Wood@LamanLibrary.org or call 771.1995 x105 to sign up!

In partnership with the Arkansas Hunger Relief Alliance and NLR's Fit 2 Live program, "Fit 2 Live" at Laman presents, Cooking Matters. Cooking Matters, an innovative nutrition education program offering 6-week Signature Courses, teaches individuals and families the skills they need to cook healthy meals and get the most from their food budgets. The Cooking Matters classes are hands-on, full participation classes taught by volunteer chefs and nutrition experts from communities large and small. Participants learn how to select nutritious, low-cost ingredients and how to turn those ingredients into delicious meals for their families. Graduates of Cooking Matters Signature Courses don?t just leave with cooking skills; they leave with the confidence and pride in knowing they can make a difference in the health and happiness of their families.

More Info

NEH on the Road Presents, "House and Home"

Sep
17

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

What makes a house a home?

Throughout American history, people have lived in all sorts of places, from military barracks and two-story colonials to college dormitories and row houses. Drawn from the flagship installation at The National Building Museum, House & Home embarks on a tour of houses both familiar and surprising, through past and present, to explore the varied history, and many cultural meanings of the American home.

The NEH on the Road version of House & Home draws on themes originated by the National Building Museum to encourage visitors to explore how our ideal of the perfect house and our experience of what it means to "be at home" have changed over time. The exhibition includes domestic furnishings and home construction materials, photographs, "please touch" interactive components, and films. Together, the objects and images illustrate how transformations in technology, government policy, and consumer culture have impacted American domestic life.

House & Home presents an overview of architecture styles and living patterns that have been featured in American homes over the years. Quotes, toys, and other graphic advertising materials prompt visitors to think about the different ideas embodied in the words "house" and "home." The exhibition also showcases domestic objects - from cooking utensils to telephones - and traces how household goods tell the stories of our family traditions, heritage, and the activity of daily living.

Another key section of House & Home explores how different laws, historic trends, and economic factors have impacted housing in America. The American Dream, once more generally seen as an aspiration to prosperity, grew in the 20th century to be synonymous with home ownership. Visitors learn about the economy of housing and how homes have been promoted and sold. Issues of housing inequality, land distribution, and the role of the government are examined, from the Colonial period though the Homestead Act and the creation of the Federal Housing Administration in the 1930s; and from the Oklahoma Land Rush to the subprime loan crisis. Related sections of House & Home looks outward, exploring the relationship of the individual house to the larger society by presenting examples of contemporary community development through film.

Video and film features immerse audiences in a nation-wide tour of residential buildings and community developments that reflect contemporary trends. From futuristic dormitories to post-Katrina communities built on shared interests in music, the images evoke the experience of residential space and illustrate the evolution and diversity of American domestic architecture, design, and community. In its scope, content, and presentation House & Home moves beyond the bricks and mortar to challenge our ideas about what it means to be at home in America.

More Info

Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France

Sep
17

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

More than three generations of Americans have grown up reading the stories of an irrepressible little brown monkey known in this country as ?Curious George.? But few people know about the incredible journey made by his creators, Margret and H.A. Rey, to escape the Nazi invasion of Paris at the start of World War II.

Stashing a few precious belongings and manuscripts in their knapsacks and the baskets of their bicycles, the Jewish couple fled Paris in June 1940, starting a five month odyssey by bike, train, and boat that would eventually bring them to American shores in October 1940.

The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France tells the story of the Rey?s journey, featuring 27 framed art prints by artist Allan Drummond and supplemental archival images from the extraordinary holdings of the DeGrummond Collection of Children?s Literature at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Based in part on the 2005 publication, The Journey that Saved Curious George: The True Wartime Escape of Margret and H.A. Rey, written by Louise Borden and illustrated by Allan Drummond (Houghton Mifflin Company, New York), The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey From France was organized by the Institute for Holocaust Education in Omaha, Nebraska. More than just the tale of a rousing escape from occupied France, this exhibition celebrates a timeless survival story, one that serves as a potent reminder of the power of human creativity and the cost when voices and visions are silenced by the impact of war.

More Info

STORYTIME

Sep
17

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Preschool age children are invited to come hear stories and make a craft.

More Info

BABYTIME

Sep
17

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Babies, ages 6 months to 2 years, and their caretakers will enjoy stories, songs, and fingerplays.

More Info

NEH on the Road Presents, "House and Home"

Sep
18

Thursday, September 18, 2014

What makes a house a home?

Throughout American history, people have lived in all sorts of places, from military barracks and two-story colonials to college dormitories and row houses. Drawn from the flagship installation at The National Building Museum, House & Home embarks on a tour of houses both familiar and surprising, through past and present, to explore the varied history, and many cultural meanings of the American home.

The NEH on the Road version of House & Home draws on themes originated by the National Building Museum to encourage visitors to explore how our ideal of the perfect house and our experience of what it means to "be at home" have changed over time. The exhibition includes domestic furnishings and home construction materials, photographs, "please touch" interactive components, and films. Together, the objects and images illustrate how transformations in technology, government policy, and consumer culture have impacted American domestic life.

House & Home presents an overview of architecture styles and living patterns that have been featured in American homes over the years. Quotes, toys, and other graphic advertising materials prompt visitors to think about the different ideas embodied in the words "house" and "home." The exhibition also showcases domestic objects - from cooking utensils to telephones - and traces how household goods tell the stories of our family traditions, heritage, and the activity of daily living.

Another key section of House & Home explores how different laws, historic trends, and economic factors have impacted housing in America. The American Dream, once more generally seen as an aspiration to prosperity, grew in the 20th century to be synonymous with home ownership. Visitors learn about the economy of housing and how homes have been promoted and sold. Issues of housing inequality, land distribution, and the role of the government are examined, from the Colonial period though the Homestead Act and the creation of the Federal Housing Administration in the 1930s; and from the Oklahoma Land Rush to the subprime loan crisis. Related sections of House & Home looks outward, exploring the relationship of the individual house to the larger society by presenting examples of contemporary community development through film.

Video and film features immerse audiences in a nation-wide tour of residential buildings and community developments that reflect contemporary trends. From futuristic dormitories to post-Katrina communities built on shared interests in music, the images evoke the experience of residential space and illustrate the evolution and diversity of American domestic architecture, design, and community. In its scope, content, and presentation House & Home moves beyond the bricks and mortar to challenge our ideas about what it means to be at home in America.

More Info

Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France

Sep
18

Thursday, September 18, 2014

More than three generations of Americans have grown up reading the stories of an irrepressible little brown monkey known in this country as ?Curious George.? But few people know about the incredible journey made by his creators, Margret and H.A. Rey, to escape the Nazi invasion of Paris at the start of World War II.

Stashing a few precious belongings and manuscripts in their knapsacks and the baskets of their bicycles, the Jewish couple fled Paris in June 1940, starting a five month odyssey by bike, train, and boat that would eventually bring them to American shores in October 1940.

The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey from France tells the story of the Rey?s journey, featuring 27 framed art prints by artist Allan Drummond and supplemental archival images from the extraordinary holdings of the DeGrummond Collection of Children?s Literature at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Based in part on the 2005 publication, The Journey that Saved Curious George: The True Wartime Escape of Margret and H.A. Rey, written by Louise Borden and illustrated by Allan Drummond (Houghton Mifflin Company, New York), The Wartime Escape: Margret and H.A. Rey's Journey From France was organized by the Institute for Holocaust Education in Omaha, Nebraska. More than just the tale of a rousing escape from occupied France, this exhibition celebrates a timeless survival story, one that serves as a potent reminder of the power of human creativity and the cost when voices and visions are silenced by the impact of war.

More Info

Twinkle Twinkle Baby Lap-sit Storytime (Argenta Branch)

Sep
18

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Baby Lap-sit is a program to encourage interaction between parents/caregivers and their baby (birth-18 months). During the program we will learn simple nursery rhymes, songs and enjoy short stories. Parents are welcome to bring a small blanket for their baby to sit or lie on during the program, if they choose to be on the floor.

More Info

Job Seekers Clinic

Sep
18

Thursday, September 18, 2014

The Job Seekers Clinic provides patrons with free job-seeking assistance to help them gain employment.

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CREATION STATION

Sep
18

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Join us for crafts and other fun hands-on activities!
Children all ages welcome

More Info

Audio Books

Apple iPod friendly

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The Laman Library System:

Main Library

2801 Orange Street
North Little Rock, AR 72114
Phone: 501-758-1720
Map & Directions  •  Hours

Argenta Branch

420 Main Street
North Little Rock, AR 72114
Phone: 501-687-1061
Map & Directions  •  Hours